Blog

OCSB Learning Technologies SummIT 2017

Today, I had the chance to participate in the OCSB Learning Tech Department’s 2017 SummIT. As we congregated in the Learning Commons of Immaculata High School for the morning welcome, I was struck by the energy and enthusiasm of the teachers in the room. In addition, all of the presenters for the day were classroom teachers who use or have used the technologies that they were sharing in their own teaching practice. It was a great start to the weekend and I took away something new from every session I attended, as summarized below.


Session 1: Descriptive Feedback, Learning Journals and SeeSaw App

After hearing great things from a parent who is engaged with her child’s learning through the SeeSaw App, I decided to attend this session to get an idea of what it’s all about. Simply put, the SeeSaw App is a digital portfolio that can be used in the classroom to document student learning, facilitate descriptive feedback, and enhance parent communication. It is an efficient way to keep everything organized in one place for assessment and future parent conferencing. I definitely see this app as a potential tool for building and maintaining a strong school-home connection!

Check out the video below for an overview of how the SeeSaw App can be used as a comprehensive learning journal for students.

Although there are MANY cool features, these are a few of my favourite things about the SeeSaw App:

  • Students can upload new learning in practically any form (picture, video, drawing, link, audio recording, document, etc.)
  • The app works across devices- phone, tablet, laptop
  • It is not accessible to the public/web
  • You can use folders to organize class work by subject, assignment, etc.
  • Students can provide meaningful peer feedback
  • New items and comments are vetted and approved by the teacher
  • Parents can only view their child’s learning journal
  • Parents receive notifications when their child adds an item to their SeeSaw learning journal

Session 2: Using Technology to Enhance Social Emotional Learning

Self-regulation is at the heart of Social Emotional Learning (SEL) and refers to energy expended when we respond to a stress and then recover. When we talk about self-regulation in schools, zones of regulation are often used to identify the student’s state of arousal (asleep, drowsy, hypoalert, calmly focused, hyperalert or flooded). The goal, of course, is to get back to a calmly focused state in order to successfully complete the task at hand. In the classroom, teachers aim to help their students develop self-awareness and to listen to their bodies in order to develop strategies to get back to that calm state. In order to enhance self-regulation, the following steps can be very useful:

5 Steps to Enhance SEL

  1. Read the signs of stress behaviour and reframe
  2. Recognize stressors
  3. Reduce stressors
  4. Reflect- help others identify what it feels like to be calm vs. dysregulated (see Apps)
  5. Respond- help others to learn strategies to return to calm (see Apps)

For a more detailed description of how our brain responds to stress, check out the clip below which describes the Hand Model of the Brain. Through his explanation, Dr. Siegel provides a model and the language for enhancing our emotional communication with students.

While our students may be currently using strategies that work for them, teachers often need to explicitly share strategies that will help students return to a calm state. This is where we can leverage digital technologies (apps!) to help our students develop their social emotional learning skills. Here are some key apps that were presented during the session:

Go-to Apps to Enhance SEL

  • Zones of Regulation: while there is a cost associated, this app helps students to identify and decipher emotions that are associated with the different zones of regulation through an engaging game format.
  • Healthy Minds: created by The Royal Ottawa, this amazing app is geared towards older students (Grade 6+) to help them understand the challenges they may face throughout their day and how they can respond appropriately to them. It includes a tracking component that they can use to identify how they’re feeling, connect their feelings to antecedent events or stresses, and pick a strategy to cope with their feelings. This allows students to see patterns and draw connections between situations in their daily lives and reflect on how they deal with them.
  • MindMasters 2: this is a free resource developed by CHEO that is designed to help K-3 students master emotional regulation. It incorporates mindfulness techniques through various activities that help students tune into their emotional states.

And finally, both teachers and students (and parents!) could benefit from watching the movie Inside Out. While we can’t necessarily tell what states other people are in, this movie demonstrates how we can work to identify certain indicators in order to connect with our students.


Session 3: Who is the expert? Exploring and Connecting Students with Real World Projects

The final session I attended was a whirlwind discussion led by Rola Tibshirani that introduced me to a wide variety of resources and ideas for connecting students to real-world projects and experts outside the classroom. The opportunities truly are endless with this approach to learning and I will need to spend lots of time exploring how to meaningfully leverage it for learning in the classroom. Yet, it is immediately clear that building these types of global connections sparks student engagement, provokes student inquiry, helps students develop problem-solving skills and guides them in appreciating and respecting diverse world views. This is summarized through the “KWHLAQ” chart below, which represents the 21st century version of the classic KWL chart.

Who is the expert?

As part of the session, we had the opportunity to virtually connect with Leigh Cassell using Google Hangout (so cool!). Working as a teacher in Western Ontario at a rural-based school board, Leigh recognized the lack of real-world connections between her students and wider, global communities. As the costs of field trips were astronomical, she started to explore video conferencing as a means of facilitating connections-based learning with her students.  After connecting with numerous experts and becoming “addicted” to this type of learning, Leigh founded the Digital Human Library in 2011 to connect Canadian teachers and students in rural or remote communities with experts around the world. This Digital Human Library gives access to hundreds of experts in all curriculum areas (K-12) and all you have to do is register as a teacher. Once your account is approved, you can search the library for experts based on who your students would like to connect with. It is designed to readily support student inquiry and, accordingly, 95% of the experts offer their connections for free. If you’re looking for other classes to connect with worldwide, check out Leigh’s list of global learning partners. She certainly inspired me to start thinking about how I could bring the field trip experience into the classroom, and it was a treat to be able to hangout with her from Ottawa!

Where do I find the experts?

As a starting point, here are some links to check out for fostering global citizenship in your classroom by connecting with experts around the world. There is a lot out there, so I would suggest picking one resource to start with and taking your time by exploring it in detail.


Wrap-Up

All in all, it was a jam-packed day of inspiring workshops and I am excited to further investigate how to leverage these digital tools to enhance student learning in my classroom. It was awesome to see so many educators show up on a Saturday to share, learn and reflect on learning technologies. Thanks OCSB, I had a blast!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s